Au Bal Musette Les Rue de Lappe

Au Bal Musette Les Rue de Lappe

Brassaï
Brassaï was a Hungarian photographer, sculptor, and filmmaker who rose to fame in France.
1899 – 1930
Gyula Halász was born in Brassó (Braşov), in Hungary, now Romania, to a Hungarian father and an Armenian mother. He is sometimes incorrectly described as Jewish. When he was three, his family moved to live in Paris for a year, while his father, a professor of literature, taught at the Sorbonne. As a young man, Gyula Halász studied painting and sculpture at the Academy of Fine Arts in Budapest, before joining a cavalry regiment of the Austro-Hungarian army, where he served until the end of the First World War. In 1920, Halász went to Berlin, where he worked as a journalist and studied at the Berlin-Charlottenburg Academy of Fine Arts.
In 1924, he moved to Paris where he would live the rest of his life. In order to learn the French language, he began teaching himself by reading the works of Marcel Proust. Living amongst the huge gathering of artists in the Montparnasse Quarter, he took a job as a journalist. He soon became friends with Henry Miller, Léon-Paul Fargue, and the poet Jacques Prévert.
1899 – 1930
Gyula Halász was born in Brassó (Braşov), in Hungary, now Romania, to a Hungarian father and an Armenian mother.[1] He is sometimes incorrectly described as Jewish.[2] When he was three, his family moved to live in Paris for a year, while his father, a professor of literature, taught at the Sorbonne. As a young man, Gyula Halász studied painting and sculpture at the Academy of Fine Arts in Budapest, before joining a cavalry regiment of the Austro-Hungarian army, where he served until the end of the First World War. In 1920, Halász went to Berlin, where he worked as a journalist and studied at the Berlin-Charlottenburg Academy of Fine Arts.
In 1924, he moved to Paris where he would live the rest of his life. In order to learn the French language, he began teaching himself by reading the works of Marcel Proust. Living amongst the huge gathering of artists in the Montparnasse Quarter, he took a job as a journalist. He soon became friends with Henry Miller, Léon-Paul Fargue, and the poet Jacques Prévert.
1955 – 1984
In 1956, his film, Tant qu’il y aura des bêtes, won the “Most Original Film” award at the Cannes Film Festival and in 1974 he was made Knight of the Order of Arts and Letters and given the Legion of Honor in 1976. Two years later, in 1978, he won the first “Grand Prix National de la Photographie” in Paris.
As well as a photographer, Brassaï was the author of seventeen books and numerous articles, including the 1948 novel Histoire de Marie, which was published with an introduction by Henry Miller. His Letters to My Parents and Conversations with Picasso, have been translated into English and published by the University of Chicago Press.
After 1961, when he stopped taking photographs, Brassaï concentrated his considerable energy on sculpting in stone and bronze. Several tapestries were made from his designs based on his photographs of graffiti.
Brassaï died on 7 July 1984 in Beaulieu-sur-Mer, Alpes-Maritimes, in the south of France and was interred in the Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris. The copyright representative for the Estate of Brassaï is French photography agency Réunion des Musées Nationaux (RMN), which also mangages more than 1,400 high resolution scans of Brassaï’s work.
In 2000, an exhibition of some 450 works by Brassaï was organized with the help of his widow, Gilberte at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris.

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